Family Preparedness Friday

This September You Can Be The Hero

Banner_National_Preparedness_Month_2013_leaderboard_728x90

September is National Preparedness Month (NPM). It is a time to prepare yourself and those in your care for emergencies and disasters. If you’ve seen the news recently, you know that emergencies can happen unexpectedly in communities just like yours, to people like you. We’ve seen tornado outbreaks, river floods and flash floods, historic earthquakes, tsunamis, and even water main breaks and power outages in U.S. cities affecting millions of people for days at a time.

Police, fire and rescue may not always be able to reach you quickly in an emergency or disaster. The most important step you can take in helping your local responders is being able to take care of yourself and those in your care; the more people who are prepared, the quicker the community will recover.

This September, please prepare and plan in the event you must go for three days without electricity, water service, access to a supermarket, or local services for several days. Just follow these four steps:

  • Stay Informed: Information is available from federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial resources. Access Ready.gov to learn what to do before, during, and after an emergency.
  • Make a Plan: Discuss, agree on, and document an emergency plan with those in your care. For sample plans, see Ready.gov. Work together with neighbors, colleagues, and others to build community resilience.
  • Build a Kit: Keep enough emergency supplies – water, nonperishable food, first aid, prescriptions, flashlight, and battery-powered radio on hand – for you and those in your care.
  • Get Involved: There are many ways to get involved especially before a disaster occurs. The whole community can participate in programs and activities to make their families, homes and places of worship safer from risks and threats. Community leaders agree that the formula for ensuring a safer homeland consists of volunteers, a trained and informed public, and increased support of emergency response agencies during disasters.

By taking a few simple actions, you can make your family safer. Consider planning a Ready Kids event in your community to encourage families to get prepared with their children.September is National Preparedness Month (NPM). It is a time to prepare yourself and those in your care for emergencies and disasters.  #familypreparednessfriday #edenotes

  • Volunteer to present preparedness information in your child’s class or in PTO/PTA meetings.
  • Invite officials from your local Office of Emergency Management, Citizen Corps Council, or first responder teams to speak at schools or youth events.

Use local emergency management resources to learn more about preparedness in your community.

  • Contact your local emergency management agency to get essential information on specific hazards to your area, local plans for shelter and evacuation, ways to get information before and during an emergency, and how to sign up for emergency alerts if they are available
  • Contact your local firehouse and ask for a tour and information about preparedness
  • Get involved with your local American Red Cross Chapter or train with a Community Emergency Response Team (CERT).

For more information, check out:

Family Preparedness Friday

Heigh-Ho, Heigh-Ho, It’s Off to School We Go

#Safety #checklist for when your kids get ready to go #backtoschool. #familypreparednessfriday #edenotes In my neck of the woods, kids headed back to school this week. And I’m guessing if yours haven’t started yet, they soon will be.

While I know for many parents back-to-school planning means meeting the teacher, buying cases of #2 pencils and notebook paper, and learning the new bus driver’s name, but have you considered starting the new year off buy learning your child’s school emergency plan or brushing up on your family emergency plan?

Remember, while no one likes to think of a disaster occurring, we like even less to think about a disaster occurring when we aren’t with our family.

Back to School Disaster Preparedness Checklist

Take the time now to:

  • Learn what your child’s school or day care emergency plan is.
  • Find out where children will be taken in the event of an evacuation during school hours.
  • Update your emergency contact information is at your child’s school or day care.
  • Pre-authorize a friend or relative to pick up your children in an emergency and make sure the school knows who that designated person is.
  • Have a family communications plan.
  • Review your family communication plan with your child; the plan should include contact information for an out-of-area family member or friend, since local telephone networks may not work during a major disaster.

What have you done to prepare your child for going back to school?

Superstorm Sandy Animal and Agriculture Response: Lessons Learned for Improved Planning

SCAP EDENOn April 30, 2013, S-CAP hosted its first webinar titled Superstorm Sandy Animal and Agriculture Response: Lessons Learned for Improved Planning, moderated by Scott Cotton.  Stakeholders from federal, tribal, state, and local entities attended the 1-hour meeting to listen to experiences from pre-, during, and post-disaster work. Speakers included professionals from Cooperative Extension (Ann Swinker and Keith Tidball), state departments of agriculture (Dave Chico and Roy McCallister), and APHIS (Anne McCann). The Virtual Forum webpage provides a detailed outcomes report of the webinar and a link to the archived webinar.

To learn more about the S-CAP program, including data from the programs conducted, click here.

– Written by: Chelsey Pickens
                     Agrosecurity Program Assistant, University of Kentucky