EDEN Drought Team

As Seasonal Drought Outlook (below) shows peristence and intensification of the drought over much of the country through the end of the year, I share with you the leadership of  the newly formed Drought NEIL (National EDEN Issue Leader) Team.  The team is charged with the development of  sustainable EDEN and EDEN eXtension drought preparedness, response, recovery and mitigation research based resources.  Working from a Logic Model, we will be building on the excellent resources shared by Extension Specialists and County Extension Educators.

 

University Who Email Phone
South Dakota State University E. Kim Cassel Kim.cassel@sdstate.edu 605-696-7873
University of Tennessee Tim Prather tprather@tennessee.edu 865-974-7266
University of Kentucky Tom Priddy Priddy@uky.edu 859-257-3000 ext 245
Auburn University Virginia Morgan morgamv@auburn.edu 334-844-5699
Purdue University Steve Cain cain@purdue.edu 765-494-8410
Louisiana State University Pat Skinner pskinner@agcenter.lsu.edu 225-578-2910
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Rick Atterberry ratterbe@illinois.edu 217-244-2828
University of Missouri Bev Maltsberger MaltsbergerB@missouri.edu 816-279-1691
University of Minnesota Phyllis Onstad onsta003@umn.edu 507-796-6008
University of Missouri Sherry Nelson NelsonS@missouri.edu 573-769-2177
Oregon State University Lynette Black lynette.black@oregonstate.edu 541-296-5494
University of Arkansas Deborah Tootle dtootle@uaex.edu 501-671-2228
South Dakota State University Alvaro Garcia Alvaro.garcia@sdstate.edu 605-688-5488
University of Nebraska – Lincoln Rick Koelsch rkoelsch1@unl.edu 402-472-2966
NIFA/USDA Bill Hoffman whoffman@NIFA.USDA.GOV 202-401-1112

 

Kim Cassel

 

Whole Community

Last December, and following a national dialogue, FEMA published its new initiative, A Whole Community Approach to Emergency Management: Principles, Themes, and Pathways for Action. You can read the entire document or read the highlights here.

The folks at Homeland Security Watch are thinking about the initiative and how a whole community approach will/should look if the entire community is to really be engaged in its disaster preparedness. See this post for an interesting perspective.

What does it take to engage the whole community?

 

2012 Great Central U.S. Shakeout February 7

Has the earth moved beneath your feet lately? When I checked the USGS site this week, there were 935 earthquakes recorded for the past eight days in the 48 conterminous states, Alaska, Hawaii and Puerto Rico. Those earthquakes in the conterminous (great word!) states occurred from California to Massachusetts.

The 2012 Great ShakeOuts begin in February with the Great Central U.S. ShakeOut. On February 7, more than one million people will participate in the ShakeOut. Other states, British Columbia, Guam, and New Zealand will hold their ShakeOut events later in the year. Regardless of when the event is held, all have a common message. When you feel that first jolt, immediately Drop, Cover and Hold On.

What can you do to help your communities?

  • If you live in Oklahoma, Missouri, Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi, or Alabama,  encourage your audiences to participate in the Great Central U.S. ShakeOut— it is free and open to the general public.
  • Teach audiences how they can become resilient and resistant to earthquakes. Youth groups can focus on science (what causes earthquakes) and staying safe during an earthquake. Adults can be shown how to taking steps to protect property and homes from an earthquake can actually be good practice for normal times.
  • Partner with EMA (select your state and drill down to find the local office) or Public Safety department to host an earthquake drill.
  • Model good preparedness practices. Make sure your home, office, family and colleages know the drill and are prepared.