Weather Wednesday – May through July Outlook

The Climate Prediction Center recently issued its 90-day outlook for temperature and precipitation for the U.S. It also updated the drought monitor tool.

off01_tempIn general the outlook calls for the next three months to feature above normal temperatures in the western third of the country and in the far southeastern states. Alaska and the Pacific Northwest will also be warmer than usual. Below normal temperatures are confined to much of Texas and areas of adjoining states. Most of the country will see an equal chance for above or below normal temperatures.

 

off01_prcpMuch of the nation may experience above normal precipitation from the southeast through the gulf states to the western plains and Rockies along with a good portion of Alaska. The above normal rainfall may bring drought relief to Texas and the four corners area. The Great Lakes states will see below normal precipitation and the potential of a developing drought. Lake levels and fire danger may be impacted.

 

drought 90The drought monitor shows little change in the near term for the hardest hit areas of the west, parts of Texas, and parts of the Dakotas, Minnesota and Wisconsin. Over the 90 day period of the outlook, the drought may ease in Texas and areas northwest of there. However, drought conditions may expand in the Great Lakes. Unfortunately, little or no relief is seen for California.  Just this week water use restrictions of from 8% to 36% were enacted for some municipalities.

Late breaking news.  Tornadoes in Germany!

There was a fairly broad outbreak of severe weather including tornadoes in Germany on Tuesday, May 5.  Here’s coverage from the British newspaper, The Guardian.

Drought NEIL webinars on-line: Critical Issues for the Unexpected Helper Part I & Part II

Disasters bring more than physical devastation, they also bring stress and related mental and physical illness.  And though hosted by the Drought NEIL the information presented by Sherry Nelson, LCSW and Missouri Extension Specialist is applicable to folks impacted by disasters other than drought.

The objectives of the webinar  Part I were for Extension staff to:

Identify signs/symptoms indicating stress; risk of depression & suicide.
Understand how stressors for farmers & their families are similar & how they differ from non-farmers.
Identify ways to reduce stress & when to seek professional help or refer others for professional help.
Learn about self-care tools to reduce their risk of unhealthy stress levels & its impact on their life.
Learn about national resources for help and how to identify local resources.
The objectives of the webinar Part II were for Extension Staff to:
Learn and recognize the signs of depression
Understand relationship between depression and suicide
Understand suicide risk factors specific for farmers
Understand the role we can play in preventing suicide
Learn about national resources for help and how to identify local resources
The webinar links and Resource List  may be found on the EDEN Drought Page — Individuals and Family Tab
Kim Cassel

Drought — Disaster Distress Helpline

Disaster Distress Resources

Stress, anxiety, and depression are common reactions after a disaster.

Call 1-800-985-5990. It’s Free. It’s Confidential.

Are you experiencing signs of distress as a result of a disaster?

Signs of distress may include any of the following physical and emotional reactions:

  • Sleepling too much or too little
  • Stomachaches or headaches
  • Anger, feeling edgy or lashing out at others
  • Overwhelming sadness
  • Worrying a lot of the time; feeling guilty but not sure why
  • Feeling like you have to keep busy
  • Lack of energy or always feeling tired
  • Drinking alcohol, smoking or using tobacco more than usual; using illegal drugs
  • Eating too much or too little
  • Not connecting with others
  • Feeling like you won’t ever be happy again
  • Rejecting of help.

You may be suffering more than you need to. We can help!

The Disaster Distress Helpline provides 24/7, year-round
crisis counseling and support.

The Helpline is staffed by trained counselors from a network of crisis call centers located across the United States, all of whom provide:

  • Crisis counseling for those who are in emotional distress related to any natural or human-caused disaster
  • Information on how to recognize distress and its effects on individuals and families
  • Tips for healthy coping
  • Disaster-specific resources and referral information

Kim Cassel